Macro Photography : The lizard C.Kingii by ThompJerry

The frilled-neck lizard is found mainly in the northern regions of Australia and southern New Guinea. The lizard is also, on rare occasions, found in the lower desert regions of Australia. The lizard inhabits humid climates such as those in the tropical savannah woodlands.

The frill-necked lizard is an arboreal lizard, meaning it spends a majority of its time in the trees.[9] The lizard ventures to the floor only in search of food, or to engage in territorial conflicts.[citation needed] The arboreal habitat may be a product of the lizard’s diet, which consists mainly of small arthropods and vertebrates (usually smaller lizards).[citation needed] However, the trees are most importantly used for camouflage. There is not one standard colour: rather, colouration varies according to the lizard’s environment. For example, a lizard found in a dryer, clay filled environment will most likely have a collage of oranges, reds, and browns; whereas a lizard found in a damper, more tropical region will tend to show darker browns and greys. This suggests they are adapted to their habitats; their colors are a form of camouflage.

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Macro Photography : Dumpy tree Frog by ThompJerry

This frog is similar in appearance to the magnificent tree frog (L. splendida), which inhabits only north-western Australia. Older members of that species have very large parotoid glands, which cover the entire top of their heads and droop over their tympana. The parotoid gland of the green tree frog is much smaller, and it also lacks the yellow speckling on the back and the yellow markings on the hand, groin and thigh.

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Macro Photography : The green tree frog by ThompJerry

The green tree frog is a plump, rather large tree frog, and can grow up to 11.5 cm (4.5 in) in length, with fully-grown females being slightly larger than males. There is a distinctive fatty ridge over the eye and the parotoid gland is moderately large. The iris is golden and has a horizontal slit pupil, as is typical of the Litoria genus, and the tympanum (a skin membrane similar to an eardrum) is visible just behind the eye. The limbs are short and robust and there are large adhesive discs at the end of the digits which provide grip while climbing. The fingers are about one-third webbed, and the toes nearly three-quarters webbed. The dorsal colour depends on the temperature and nature of the environment, ranging from brownish- or greyish-green to bright emerald green. The frog occasionally has small, irregularly-shaped white spots on its back. Males have a greyish, wrinkled vocal sac under the throat while the throat of females is white. The ventral surface in both sexes is creamy-white and rough in texture.

This frog is similar in appearance to the magnificent tree frog (L. splendida), which inhabits only north-western Australia. Older members of that species have very large parotoid glands, which cover the entire top of their heads and droop over their tympana. The parotoid gland of the green tree frog is much smaller, and it also lacks the yellow speckling on the back and the yellow markings on the hand, groin and thigh.

It can be distinguished from the giant tree frog (L. infrafrenata) by the distinct white stripe that that species has along the edge of the lower jaw and extending to the shoulder, which is not present in the green tree frog.

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